sometimes i wonder why only messed up boys like me n then i’m reminded why when i make fashion choices k

sometimes i wonder why only messed up boys like me n then i’m reminded why when i make fashion choices k

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kliuwong:

I haven’t taken a bubble bath in ages.

(via gentle-narcissism)

Source: kliuwong

Originally from Kristen M. Liu

i surprise visited a far away friend in an improbable one day trip. i got to wake him up by barging into his room with a manic grin at 10am and he got to wave the bus off at 6pm and i got to say goodnight during an improbable phone call in a damn near impossible situation on the last train home at 11.30pm.

i surprise visited a far away friend in an improbable one day trip. i got to wake him up by barging into his room with a manic grin at 10am and he got to wave the bus off at 6pm and i got to say goodnight during an improbable phone call in a damn near impossible situation on the last train home at 11.30pm.

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angrybisexualcesium:

literally with my guy friends it’s “how long can i stay friends with you before you say something gross and misogynistic and i don’t feel safe around you anymore”

(via stillmeaningless)

Source: angrybisexualcesium

Originally from The Adventures of Cesium

high fashion train baby

high fashion train baby

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sheishine:

Check out new work on my Behance portfolio: “Mushroom Brooches."

sheishine:

Check out new work on my portfolio: “Mushroom Brooches."

(via psychedelis)

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Source: sheishine

Originally from A Slow Crafter

(via twiabp)

Source: desenhar-te-ei

Originally from Desenhar-te-ei

merkkultra:

do men have resting bitch faces as well or do they not have negative characteristics ascribed to them for putting on a neutral rather than a deliriously happy facial expression

(via untitledunidentifiedunfinished)

Source: merkkultra

Originally from project MERKKULTRA

tamburina:

Paul Gauguin, Beach at Le Pouldu, 1889

tamburina:

Paul GauguinBeach at Le Pouldu, 1889

(via psychedelis)

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Source: tamburina

Originally from tamburina

starmanwaitinginthesky:

Olive + art bits

(via crowcrow)

Source: starmanwaitinginthesky

Originally from solitude is bliss

this is what today was like

valerie2776:

Agoera

Source: leivos

Originally from Leivos

For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

(via the-siege-perilous)

Source: Slate

Originally from Because I am a Woman

“[after a half-hearted suicide attempt at age 13]

When Daddy comes in, he carries you to bed. Is there anything you feel like you could eat, Pokey? Anything at all?

All you can imagine putting in your mouth is a cold plum, one with really tight skin on the outside but gum-shocking sweetness inside. And he and your mother discuss where he might find some this late in the season. Mother says hell I don’t know. Further north, I’d guess.

The next morning, you wake up in your bed and sit up. Mother says, Pete, I think she’s up. He hollers in, You ready for breakfast, Pokey. Then he comes in grinning, still in his work clothes from the night before. He’s holding a farm bushel. The plums he empties onto the bed river toward you through folds in the quilt. If you stacked them up, they’d fill the deepest bin at the Piggly Wiggly.

Damned if I didn’t get the urge to drive to Arkansas last night, he says.

Your mother stands behind him saying he’s pure USDA crazy.

Fort Smith, Arkansas. Found a roadside stand out there with a feller selling plums. And I says, Buddy, I got a little girl sick back in Texas. She’s got a hanker for plums and ain’t nothing else gonna do.

It’s when you sink your teeth into the plum that you make a promise. The skin is still warm from riding in the sun in Daddy’s truck, and the nectar runs down your chin.

And you snap out of it. Or are snapped out of it. Never again will you lay a hand against yourself, not so long as there are plums to eat and somebody-anybody-who gives enough of a damn to haul them to you. So long as you bear the least nibblet of love for any other creature in this dark world, though in love portions are never stingy. There are no smidgens or pinches, only rolling abundance. That’s how you acquire the resolution for survival that the coming years are about to demand. You don’t earn it. It’s given.”

Mary Karr, “Cherry” 

(via changingmorphologies)

(via the-siege-perilous)

Source: lifeinpoetry

Originally from the château of my heart